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What’s on in Yorkshire during September

PUBLISHED: 00:00 31 August 2017 | UPDATED: 11:23 01 September 2017

The Ruck

The Ruck

supplied

Entertainment and events around the region chosen for you by Tony Greenway.

FESTIVALS

 

September 2nd–22nd (& October 7th)

Ripon International Festival

Highlights this year include appearances by the Orchestra of Opera North playing Tchaikovsky, Borodin and Shostakovich; the Royal Northern Sinfonia playing Bach and Beethoven; author Jonathan Tulloch; jazz stars Jacqui Dankworth and Charlie Wood; the Brighouse and Rastrick Band and Julian Norton, the unassuming star of Channel Five series, The Yorkshire Vet.

Various venues riponinternationalfestival.com

September 17th-18th

Cottingham Food and Drink Festival

The award-winning Cottingham Food and Drink Festival will return to the village for a fifth year and will include cooking demonstrations, from top Yorkshire chefs including Brian Turner and Steph Moon will be preparing a variety of creative dishes using ingredients found at the stalls around the event!

The stalls will be selling handmade, artisan produce, such as from top quality bakers, brewers, chocolatiers, cheese makers and many more. Stalls will be situated in the Market Green, King Street and Hallgate.

For more information visit www.cottinghamfoodfestival.co.uk

September 23rd & 24th

The Cheese Festival

A new weekend festival with numerous producers and connoisseurs from across the Yorkshire Dales National Park and the Nidderdale Area Of Outstanding Natural Beauty offering product tastings as well as staging cookery, cheese-making, grading and drink-pairing demonstrations. The festival will also stage several guided walking and cycling tours exploring the countryside, tracing the importance of the monks’ contribution and the evolution of cheese-making and dairying across the region, tasting local specialities as they go.

Wensleydale Creamery, Hawes 01969 667664 wensleydale.co.uk

September 23rd–October 1st

Richmond Walking & Book Festival

This festival dedicated to walking and reading (tip: don’t do both at the same time) is now in its 13th year. Author Val McDermid pops up at one point for an evening at the town’s beautiful Georgian Theatre Royal while Joanne Harris appears at Richmond School, as does Jo Baker. She’s the author of Longbourn, a bestseller which reframed the events of Pride and Prejudice, and which is set to be made into a film.

Various venues 01748 824243 booksandboots.org

 

EVENTS

September 1st-October 1st

One Day, Maybe

I’d love to tell you more about One Day, Maybe but I don’t really know much about it. Safe to say that this is a ‘site responsive’ work which means you should expect to walk through a multi-storey building in Hull in small groups to watch performers and interact with installations (and expect to take two hours doing so). The director says ‘every show is a little haunting, as if the ghostly journey through a building is not just a physical experience but a trip into the self’. Nope. Still none the wiser.

Hull City Centre hull2017.co.uk

September 1st-3rd

Freedom Festival

A festival that launched 10 years ago as ‘a platform... for local, national and international representations of freedom’. The highlight has to be a lecture by Kofi Annan (not surprisingly sold out already), the former Secretary-General of the UN and founder and chair of the Kofi Annan Foundation.

Various venues, Hull freedomfestival.co.uk

September 15th-17th

Harrogate Autumn Flower Show

Who needs summer anyway? As we hurtle headlong into autumn, you can still get your flower fix from this annual show, which includes Kitchen Garden Live, a plant nursery pavilion, a food theatre, a giant vegetable competition (of course) and inspirational border gardens.

Great Yorkshire Showground 01423 546158 flowershow.org.uk

September 15th & 16th

Open Air Cinema

RHS Harlow Carr Gardens opens its grounds for some summertime cinema beginning with an open air screening of 1980’s classic Dirty Dancing. Doors open 6.30pm for 7.45pm start. And on the 16th Top Gun with Tom Cruise of course, who takes to the skies in the popular 1980s blockbuster, endures dogfights, bar fights and volleyball! Featuring a raft of acting talent including Kelly McGillis, Anthony Edwards, Val Kilmer and Meg Ryan. Doors 6.30pm for 7.45pm start.

RHS Garden Harlow Carr, Harrogate Tickets from Derby Quad Box Office on 01332 290606 derbyquad.co.uk

 

THEATRE

August 31st–September 9th

The Suitcase

You get two big names for the price of one in this thought-provoking evening: an adaptation of a novel by the late Es’kia Mphahlele — one of South Africa’s, greatest writers, thinkers and critics — set to a soundtrack by legendary musician, Hugh Masekela. A young husband who is desperate to provide for his pregnant wife steals a suitcase not knowing what might inside...

Hull Truck Theatre 01482 323638 hulltruck.co.uk

September 1st–October 7th

A Brief History of Women

This brand new Ayckbourn — receiving its World Premiere at the SJT — is something of a milestone. Sir Alan describes it as ‘a comedy in four parts about an unremarkable man and the remarkable women who loved him, left him, or lost him over 60 years; and of the equally remarkable old manor house that saw and heard it all happen’.

Which is fair enough; but why is it a milestone? Well, it’s 60 years since Ayckbourn joined the Stephen Joseph Theatre although, back then, he wasn’t an aspiring playwright, he was an assistant stage manager and actor. ‘It’s a play about a man — it’s a bit autobiographical — who’s fairly ineffectual,’ he says. ‘His life has been radically changed by a series of women, just as women have been an enormous influence on my life.’ In the intervening 60 years, Ayckbourn has become one of the world’s most prolific and best-loved playwrights. And he’s done it all from his base in Scarborough.

Talking of which, also at the SJT, on September 10th and 17th, is A Brief History of Plays, a two-evening exploration of Ayckbourn’s six decades with the company. Each night will cover 30 years of his work and feature reminiscences and anecdotes from Sir Alan, alongside extracts from his plays acted by members of his summer company, as well as (it says here) ‘some familiar faces from the past’.

Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough 01723 370541 sjt.uk.com

September 9th-23rd

The Kite Runner

The production is based on the harrowing bestseller by Khaled Hosseini and tells the tale of two childhood friends from Afghanistan whose lives are torn apart by a shocking and violent incident.

West Yorkshire Playhouse 0113 213 7700 wyp.org.uk

September 15th & 16th

The Ruck

Joyce Branagh, sister of Ken, directs this new feel-good play based on the real-life story of the first British girls’ rugby league team to tour Australia, who were all from Batley. She says: ‘It’s a beautiful new play that is vibrant, funny and extremely moving about Yorkshire, about the problems of being a teenager — and being a parent of a teenager — and how a brilliant game like rugby league can be a support, a focus, and a metaphor for the ups and downs of everyday life. Always remember: “Try try again...”’ After receiving its premiere at the LBT in Huddersfield, the play goes on tour (and will be the first-ever LBT production to do so) to Wakefield (September 18th & 19th), Doncaster (September 20th & 21st) and Barnsley (September 22nd).

Lawrence Batley Theatre, Huddersfield 01484 430528 thelbt.org

September 15th–October 7th

Of Kith and Kin

A world premiere of a dark comedy by Chris Thompson, directed by Sheffield’s artistic director, Robert Hastie. Thompson, a former social worker, has created a story about Daniel and Oliver, a gay couple about to have a baby via a surrogate but when Daniel’s mother turns up at the babyshower and their relationship begins to crack under the strain...

Studio Theatre, Sheffield 0114 249 6000 sheffieldtheatres.co.uk

September 21st–October 14th

Desire Under the Elms

When were you last shocked, properly shocked, by something you saw in the theatre? You know, a play or a show that made you give an involuntary gasp of horror? It doesn’t have to be a drama. It could be a stand-up gig. For instance, comedian and magician Jerry Sadowitz says so many offensive things on stage that it’s not uncommon for audience members to walk out on him.

The last stage production that had me wincing was, amazingly, King Lear — a play that is over 400 years old. I like to think I don’t shock that easily but I’d forgotten about the Earl of Gloucester’s eye-gouging scene and, in this adaptation, it was particularly gruesome: the director had gone the full Tarantino, so there was lots of screaming and gore, and it all went on for ages. By the end of it, I was practically sitting in the lap of the person next to me. But come on.

Compared to some scenes of sex and violence that have taken place on the UK stage over the years, I realise it was never going to make outraged headlines in the Daily Mail.

To do that, you have to put on a production by the late Sarah Kane. Blasted, for instance, Kane’s first play is just about the most depressing and gratuitous night you can have in the theatre. Even the Guardian’s theatre critic, Michael Billington — who is more open-minded than most — was shocked by Blasted when it received its premiere in 1995, calling it ‘naive tosh’ although he’s since changed his tune, and in a later review admitted to being ‘overcome by its sombre power’. If you haven’t seen Blasted, I could tell you some of the more disgusting things that happen in the plot but I think I won’t. I’ll just say it’s a play you wouldn’t forget it in a hurry; the same way you wouldn’t forget, say, Edward Bond’s Saved or Maxwell Anderson’s adaptation of William March’s The Bad Seed, both of which push the dramatic envelope in astounding ways.

Which brings me to Desire Under the Elms, a 1924 tragedy by American playwright Eugene O’Neill, which, with its with themes of adultery, incest and infanticide, was once banned in Britain for 16 years and subject to obscenity laws in the US. When it first opened, it was greeted with alarm by the critics while its Los Angeles cast was actually arrested for performing it.

The plot sees an old widowed New England farmer returning home with a young gold-digging wife, much to the disgust of his three hard-working sons, two of whom want to defy him, while the other wants to supplant him. It’s a grimly fascinating, naggingly cheerless and ultimately profoundly disturbing story. But does it have shock value? Nah, not really. Not anymore. Not after Blasted. Times really have changed in the theatre.

Crucible Theatre, Sheffield
 0114 249 6000 sheffieldtheatres.co.uk

September 21st–October 14th

Desire Under the Elms

When were you last shocked, properly shocked, by something you saw in the theatre? You know, a play or a show that made you give an involuntary gasp of horror? It doesn’t have to be a drama. It could be a stand-up gig. For instance, comedian and magician Jerry Sadowitz says so many offensive things on stage that it’s not uncommon for audience members to walk out on him.

The last stage production that had me wincing was, amazingly, King Lear — a play that is over 400 years old. I like to think I don’t shock that easily but I’d forgotten about the Earl of Gloucester’s eye-gouging scene and, in this adaptation, it was particularly gruesome: the director had gone the full Tarantino, so there was lots of screaming and gore, and it all went on for ages. By the end of it, I was practically sitting in the lap of the person next to me. But come on.

Compared to some scenes of sex and violence that have taken place on the UK stage over the years, I realise it was never going to make outraged headlines in the Daily Mail.

To do that, you have to put on a production by the late Sarah Kane. Blasted, for instance, Kane’s first play is just about the most depressing and gratuitous night you can have in the theatre. Even the Guardian’s theatre critic, Michael Billington — who is more open-minded than most — was shocked by Blasted when it received its premiere in 1995, calling it ‘naive tosh’ although he’s since changed his tune, and in a later review admitted to being ‘overcome by its sombre power’. If you haven’t seen Blasted, I could tell you some of the more disgusting things that happen in the plot but I think I won’t. I’ll just say it’s a play you wouldn’t forget it in a hurry; the same way you wouldn’t forget, say, Edward Bond’s Saved or Maxwell Anderson’s adaptation of William March’s The Bad Seed, both of which push the dramatic envelope in astounding ways.

Which brings me to Desire Under the Elms, a 1924 tragedy by American playwright Eugene O’Neill, which, with its with themes of adultery, incest and infanticide, was once banned in Britain for 16 years and subject to obscenity laws in the US. When it first opened, it was greeted with alarm by the critics while its Los Angeles cast was actually arrested for performing it.

The plot sees an old widowed New England farmer returning home with a young gold-digging wife, much to the disgust of his three hard-working sons, two of whom want to defy him, while the other wants to supplant him. It’s a grimly fascinating, naggingly cheerless and ultimately profoundly disturbing story. But does it have shock value? Nah, not really. Not anymore. Not after Blasted. Times really have changed in the theatre.

Crucible Theatre, Sheffield 0114 249 6000 sheffieldtheatres.co.uk

September 22nd–October 14th

A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian

An adaptation of Marina Lewycka’s comic novel comes to Hull. If you haven’t read it, this bit of dialogue should tell you everything you need to know: ‘This gold digging, blonde bombshell, with her superior breasts is not going to con our father of his small worldly possessions.’

Hull Truck Theatre 01482 323638 hulltruck.co.uk

September 26th-30th

For Love or Money

Blake Morrison’s adaptation of Alain-Rene Lesage’s 18th century French comedy, Turcaret, for Northern Broadsides.

West Yorkshire Playhouse 0113 213 7700 wyp.org.uk

September 27th & 28th

You Have Been Watching

A new comedy featuring eight actors with learning disabilities from the innovative Dark Horse (LBT’s resident theatre company).

Lawrence Batley Theatre, Huddersfield 01484 430528 thelbt.org

 

MUSICALS

September 6th-23rd

It’s Different for Girls

Directed by Becky Hope-Palmer (associate director of The Hypocrite, which received its world premiere at this year’s Hull 2017 programme), this musical comedy with original songs is inspired by Hull’s own 1960s beat girl band, Mandy & The Girlfriends.

East Riding Theatre, Beverley 01482 874050 eastridingtheatre.co.uk

September 9th-16th

Beautiful

Carole King, one of the world’s most important and influential singer songwriters, like, ever, provides the soundtrack for this Olivier Award-winning musical based on her life story. And what a life — and what a soundtrack: it includes You Make Me Feel Like a Natural Woman, Take Good Care of my Baby, You’ve Got a Friend, So Far Away, It Might As Well Rain Until September, Up on the Roof, and Locomotion. The show comes to Hull in November, Sheffield in February 2018 and Leeds in May 2018.

The Alhambra, Bradford 01274 432000 bradford-theatres.co.uk

 

SPECIAL APPEARANCES

September 8th

An Evening with Sir Michael Parkinson

You won’t, I’m afraid, get a free pen as an introductory offer if you buy a ticket to see Parky at the Harrogate Theatre. But you will be regaled with lots of showbiz anecdotes about the stars he interviewed over the years on his chat shows for BBC and ITV. Stories about Meg Ryan probably won’t take up a vast amount of time, mind.

Harrogate Theatre 01423 502116 harrogatetheatre.co.uk

September 15th

An Evening with Pam Ayres

To get the most out of the next few lines, you’ll have to imagine you’re speaking them in a West Country accent. Like this. Ahem. ‘I am a bunny rabbit, sitting in me hutch. I loik to sit up this end. I don’t care for that end... much.’ Yes, it is Pam Ayres, poet and philosopher although, despite that Devonian twang, Google says she was born and brought up in Oxfordshire. Really?

York Theatre Royal 01904 623568 yorktheatreroyal.co.uk

 

OPERA

September 16th, 23rd, 30th

Pagliacci

I can only go by the press photo, which is of man with a clown mask, a sneer and a knife, but this Opera North production looks like it may well go heavy on the horror. As the company itself says: ‘Pagliacci is an operatic rollercoaster, hurtling towards a bloody climax that unfolds in front of the shocked on-stage audience.’ It also advises us to ‘strap in tight and get ready to career from laughter to horrified awe as comedy and tragedy collide.’

Leeds Grand Theatre 0844 848 2720 operanorth.co.uk

September 27th & 29th

Trial by Jury

The chorus of Opera North makes up the cast of this sprightly production of Gilbert & Sullivan’s first operetta.

Leeds Grand Theatre 0844 848 2720 operanorth.co.uk

 

EXHIBITIONS

Until September 23rd

The Toy Box: From Pop to Present

A new exhibition ‘exploring the use of toys in the world of contemporary art and design’. It kicks off with British Pop Art of the 1950s and 1960s and moves on to showcase paintings, prints and sculpture from around the world.

The Barnsley Civic 01226 327000 barnsleycivic.co.uk

Until November 5th

Picasso Ceramics

The late Sir Dickie Attenborough was an avid collector of Picasso’s ceramic works and now some of these pieces are in York for the very first time, by permission of the Attenborough estate.

York Art Gallery yorkartgallery.org.uk

Until October 8th

Howard Hodgkin: Painting India

Hodgkin — who died just a few months ago, aged 84 — was widely regarded as one of this country’s finest painters. He was also a frequent traveller to India, which inspired some of his most powerful work. This excellent exhibition includes paintings, photos and documents from his many visits. Speaking last year about the show, Hodgkin said that India ‘proved a revelation. It changed my way of thinking and, probably, the way I paint’.

The Hepworth Wakefield 01924 247360 hepworthwakefield.org

 

FURTHER AFIELD

1st-3rd

Chatsworth Country Fair

This year’s Chatsworth Country Fair promises to be spectacular fun for all the family with three days of dazzling displays on horseback, daring motorcycle stunts, a human flight team and aerobatics. In the showground there’s something for everyone from fishing to falconry, wintage cars to hot air balloons. Pluse, there’s all the fun of the fair.

Enjoy a true taste of the very best the countryside has to offer. Sample the delicious fare on offer in the Fine Food Village and be inspired by cooking demonstrations by some of the country’s finest chefs including Paul Hollywood, Mary Berry CBE, John Torode and Lisa Faulkner.

www.chatsworthcountryfair.co.uk

 

 

 

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