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5 reasons why you should move to Staithes

PUBLISHED: 00:00 16 July 2019 | UPDATED: 12:06 16 July 2019

Staithes

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Michelle Maddison Photography

Staithes (c) Michelle Maddison Photography

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Neighbourhood know-how, places and people.

Staithes

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Michelle Maddison PhotographyStaithes (c) Michelle Maddison Photography

Location, location

Sheltered between two domineering cliffs, Staithes is home to colourful cottages, whimsical shops, stunning galleries and cosy cafes, all jostling for their own space in this traditional North Yorkshire seaside town. It's a snug hamlet, once home to one of the biggest fishing ports on the north east coast. Indeed, you'll still see the fleets of boats heading out to catch cod, lobster and crab and colourful lobster pots parked around the harbour.

It's on the A174 coast road which has access to Middlesbrough and Teesside - a half hour's drive for rail and airport links. The village itself isn't car-friendly, which is why people love it. Very boat-friendly however.

Staithes

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Michelle Maddison PhotographyStaithes (c) Michelle Maddison Photography

Bag a property

Discover hideaway homes in the alleys, ginnels and cobbled streets of Staithes and marvel at the cutesy cottages cuddling the tiny streets, each with their own charming names…Felicity House, Shangri-la, Cinder Path, Confidence Cottage and, of course, Captain Cook's Cottage.

Lots of holiday homes in Staithes, so prices reflect its charm and popularity. September's arts festival hosts open studios so it's a great opportunity to see behind the front doors.

Staithes

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Michelle Maddison PhotographyStaithes (c) Michelle Maddison Photography

Explore

Staithes whisks you back in time and is a haven for history lovers. Captain Cook is the area's most famous son. He started his career here as an apprentice in the local grocers.

In fact, a must-see is the Captain Cook and Staithes Heritage Centre to drink in Staithes' fishing and smuggling past as well as see a recreation of the aforementioned grocers.

Staithes

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Michelle Maddison PhotographyStaithes (c) Michelle Maddison Photography

Café & cocktails

Seafood is obviously top of the menu in Staithes and locals and visitors alike love to chow down at the Cod and Lobster. With its views out to sea - perfectly romantic on a blustery day- you can tuck into seafood platters, local scampi and, of course, fish and chips washed down with a local ale or two.

The Royal George is another popular pub to bundle into and either relax by the blazing fire on chilly days or take in the atmosphere on the street tables outside. It's famed for its local crab sandwiches as well as its homemade steak and ale pie. Find traditional fish and chips at Excelsior Fisheries - THE place to go. Freshly cooked cod and haddock, crispy batter and proper chips. Not forgetting the all-important scraps… drench them in salt and vinegar… is your mouth watering yet? Dotty's Vintage Tearoom is an Aladdin's cave of trinkets, treasures- and cakes! 'Dotty's has the best scones ever', says Al Milnes from Staithes Gallery. 'But work up and appetite first- they're huge'.

Staithes

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Michelle Maddison PhotographyStaithes (c) Michelle Maddison Photography

Retail therapy

Betsy and Bo is a treasure trove for the foodie. Glorious, traditional jars of sweets nestle alongside homemade choccies and local gins. Head into the back room for Mediterranean goodies, local jams and sauces, artisan breads and a fridge full of tempting cheeses. Oh and look out for their vacuum packed octopus if you're feeling adventurous!

Staithes Gallery is a centrepiece and opened in 2006 under the watchful auspices of Al Milnes - who also runs Staithes Festival and the art school. In the gallery, expect an illustrious mix of art for all budgets and tastes with hundreds of works inspired by Staithes. 'For an artist, Staithes is a dream - the quality of the light and the range of subjects from the bobbing boats and mish-mash of rooftops to the rugged cliffs and breath-taking harbour', says Al Milnes.

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